optical heart rate monitoring: FR935 vs. F3HR

Since Q4 2015 I was using a Fenix 3 (DCR, t5kr, fellrnr). Due to technical problems (serial number bug) it got replaced in Q2 2017 by Garmin. They offered me (for additional charge which was fair) to upgrade to a Fenix 3 HR (DCR). This way I got 2 years of warranty again – which can’t be too bad especially with Garmin products. 🙄

In my use case the oHR of the F3HR did work like 👽💩. It even was worse than the Rhythm+ (DCR, t5kr, fellrnr) – and the R+ already was for me pretty unreliable. 😥

Since end of July 2017 I use a Forerunner 935 (DCR, t5kr, fellrnr). The FR935 works pretty amazing 🎉✨🎆👏  – except for walking (ideal use case for oHR). 😬😡

 

Here (only) some results of my testing…

 

RowErg (Concept2)

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DCR’s Analyzer – for the 🤓 inside us. (😊)

e8b9c93a-7644-42bb-4f2a-82ee40c894ca
DCR’s Analyzer

e04d453f-c882-43d5-5294-85c80d80b121
DCR’s Analyzer

 

SkiErg (Concept2)

eb9eec7d-72a4-40fc-4144-8d1343c3e553
DCR’s Analyzer

322c72b5-8075-46d3-65a6-cdc41f086920
DCR’s Analyzer

 

Zwift (Indoor Cycling)

5c31041a-0406-4068-5249-9b943519052c
DCR’s Analyzer

 

Run

0ad1b777-0249-4150-6461-249a82ee3f35
DCR’s Analyzer

d274cc47-3d19-4840-5f45-cb9dceb96855
DCR’s Analyzer

a86e9ad4-95cc-4a42-7cef-440c6f6d0933.png
DCR’s Analyzer

 

Walk

a0873c01-f893-4fe2-4a83-d0bc64544dcf
DCR’s Analyzer

1bb08a9d-d291-4cac-7878-653c50849bab
DCR’s Analyzer

 

…to be continued, I guess. 🤔

 

 

Hope that helps (someone).

CHeers,
Boris

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Be careful with published research

People sometimes judge me as “a bit negative”, “not following blindly”, “sceptical” or “why he’s not saying what I like to hear”; there are many similar drawers to be put in.

The reason for my behavior is quite simple:

The more I know, the less I know, the more questions I have.

just use the word ‘fatigue’ :-)

The concept of lactic acid fatigue is outdated. Bear the above points in mind, and you too will realize how prolific this misunderstanding is. So next time you’re pushing out a hard interval, or you wake up after a hard session, and you need to describe your fatigue, just use the word ‘fatigue’. I can assure you that a more correct description would be far more long-winded.

http://www.athletic-education.co.uk/posts/lactate-myths.html

How to train? It depends.

[…] Generally, each type of athlete needs to focus on training in a unique way. […] In my last post I proposed that an athlete should do a broad range of intensities throughout the year with only the distribution of that intensity varying. It’s based, in part, on the polarized 80-20 training research studies that have been gaining traction among athletes in the last 10 years or so, and, in part, on my personal experience. Several of you have noted that it’s a slight shift from what I’ve said in some of my books. And you’d be right. The times have changed. Training has changed. I’ve changed.[…]

http://www.joefrielsblog.com/2016/01/how-should-i-train-it-depends.html

Interpreting HRV Trends in Athletes: High Isn’t Always Good and Low Isn’t Always Bad

Though the concept of HRV is relatively simple, its interpretation can be quite complex. As a result, considerable confusion surrounds HRV data interpretation. I believe much of this confusion can be attributed to the overly simplistic guidelines that have been promoted for the casual-end, non-expert user.

HRVtraining

This article was written for the FreelapUSA site. The intro is posted below. You can follow the link for the full article. Thanks to Christopher Glaeser from Freelap for inviting my contribution as I’ve found this site to be a great resource.

Interpreting HRV Trends in Athletes: High Isn’t Always Good and Low Isn’t Always Bad

Heart rate variability (HRV) monitoring has become increasingly popular in both competitive and recreational sports and training environments due to the development of smartphone apps and other affordable field tools. Though the concept of HRV is relatively simple, its interpretation can be quite complex. As a result, considerable confusion surrounds HRV data interpretation. I believe much of this confusion can be attributed to the overly simplistic guidelines that have been promoted for the casual-end, non-expert user.

In the context of monitoring fatigue or training status in athletes, a common belief is that high HRV is…

View original post 98 more words

Hurray

According to the directory of thisisant the PM5 does not support the FIT profile, but this wrong – PM5 does support it.

  • Connect the watch to the PM 4|5. Setup any sort of workout or just start to row (as long as the stays connected, all sort of rowing will be saved within one session on the watch – very comfy!). Do your workout.
  • After you have finished, disconnect (turn off PM) from PM 4|5.
  • Import the session(s) into ST3 .

What you get is…

1507092700

Or (zoomed in and partially selected to get detailed informations)…

150709212451

150710074302

Really. Extremely. Useful. Woooohoooo! 😀

Sidenote: And… byebye Rowpro (I hated this crappy piece of software), ErgData (not helpful for analysis, but more comfy for upload) and BoatCoach (much better than ErgData, gives some graphs/data, but not that helpful if you’re not an Excel pro).